Mars’ organic carbon may have originated from a series of electrochemical reactions between briny liquids and volcanic minerals, according to new analyses of three Martian meteorites from a team led by the Geophysical Laboratory’s Andrew Steele published in Science Advances.

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Caroline Dorn of the University of Zurich. She will present, "Interior characterization in multiplanetary systems: TRAPPIST-1."

Geochemistry, Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Joe Michael of Sandia National Laboratory. He will present, "Electron backscatter diffraction in materials and planetary sciences: From welds to iron meteorites."

Geochemistry, Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Takuo Okuchi of Okayama University. He will present, "Quantitative analysis of hydrogen in deep-earth minerals by TOF Laue single crystal neutron diffraction."

High Pressure, Planetary Science

Lin Wang is a Carnegie fellow at the Geophysical Laboratory.  He is working with Yingwei Fei on the connectivity of iron sulfide liquid in a Bridgemanite matrix.  Wang is also interested in the rheology of Earth's materials and high pressure generation.  Prior to the Geophysical Laboratory, Wang

High Pressure, Planetary Science

High Pressure, Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Allen McNamara of Michigan State University. He will present, "Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces in the Lower Mantle."

Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with John Brucato of INAF Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri. He will present, "Heterogeneous catalysis in harsh environments: detect organic compounds in space."

Planetary Science

Our Broad Branch Road Spring Neighborhood Lecture Series continues with Carnegie's Observatories Director John Mulchaey.  Mulchaey will present, "Eyes on the Universe: Carnegie’s Leadership in Astronomy Today."

High Pressure, Matter at Extreme States, Planetary Science

Washington, DC — Plumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth’s mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth’s formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from the Geophysical Laboratory's Yingwei Fei and Colin Jackson published in Nature.

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