Astrobiology, Mineralogy, Planetary Science

Washington, DC— A team of scientists including Carnegie’s Dina Bower and Andrew Steele weigh in on whether microstructures found in 3.46 billion-year-old samples of a silica-rich rock called chert found in Western Australia are the planet’s oldest fossils.

Planetary Science

Washington, DC— As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth.

Geochemistry, Planetary Science

Washington, DC— New work from a team including Carnegie’s Christopher Glein has revealed the pH of water spewing from a geyser-like plume on Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

Astrobiology, Planetary Science

Washington, DC—After extensive analyses by a team of scientists led by Carl Agee at the University of New Mexico, researchers have identified a new class of Martian meteorite that likely originated from Mars’s crust.

High Pressure, Planetary Science

Washington, DC— The mantles of Earth and other rocky planets are rich in magnesium and oxygen. Due to its simplicity, the mineral magnesium oxide is a good model for studying the nature of planetary interiors.

Planetary Science

Washington, DC, 12 July 2012 — New research led by Carnegie scientists indicates that frozen water distributed throughout much of the early Solar System is the source of water on Earth. 

Mineralogy, Planetary Science

Washington, DC — Mineral evolution posits that Earth’s near-surface mineral diversity gradually increased through an array of chemical and biological processes.

Astrobiology, Planetary Science

Washington, DC — Molecules containing large chains of carbon and hydrogen--the building blocks of all life on Earth--have been the targets of missions to Mars from Viking to the present day.

Astrobiology, Planetary Science

Washington, DC—Meteorites hold a record of the chemicals that existed in the early Solar System and that may have been a crucial source of the organic compounds that gave rise to life on Earth.

Geochemistry, Planetary Science

Washington, DC—Formaldehyde, a poison and a common molecule throughout the universe, is likely the source of the solar system’s organic carbon solids—abundant in both comets and asteroids.

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