Geochemistry

The Geophysical Laboratory is pleased to announce the arrival of new Postdoctoral Researcher, 

Geochemistry

The research of Associate Professor at Brown University Stephen Parman focuses on the chemical evolution of the Earth, moons, and planets. He will deliver a seminar tracing volatile recycling in the mantle with noble gases.

Geochemistry

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Denis Andrault of Université Blaise Pascal. He will present:"“On thermal state of the deep Earth during its history.”

Geochemistry

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Paolo Sossi of the Institute of Physics of the Globe of Paris. He will present: "Evaporation of moderately volatile elements from silicate melts: experiments and theory".

 

Geochemistry, Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Joe Michael of Sandia National Laboratory. He will present, "Electron backscatter diffraction in materials and planetary sciences: From welds to iron meteorites."

Geochemistry

Join the Geophysical Laboratory as we kick-off our 2018-19 Neighborhood Lecture Series with GL Director, Mike Walter.  He will present, "Deep Blue Planet."  Doors open at 6pm, lecture at 6:30pm.

Geochemistry

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Geoff Gilleaudeau of ASU's School of Earth and Space Exploration. He will present, "Probing the Proterozoic and Paleozoic record of Earth surface oxygenation: lessons from metal isotope geochemistry."

Geochemistry, Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Takuo Okuchi of Okayama University. He will present, "Quantitative analysis of hydrogen in deep-earth minerals by TOF Laue single crystal neutron diffraction."

Geochemistry

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with GL's own Doug Rumble. He will present, "Microbes, Mud Volcanoes, and Methane."

Geochemistry, Matter at Extreme States, Mineralogy

Blue diamonds—like the world-famous Hope Diamond at the National Museum of Natural History—formed up to four times deeper in the Earth’s mantle than most other diamonds, according to new work by Carnegie’s Steven Shirey, Emma Bullock, and Jianhua Wang and published on the cover of Nature.

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